Week 2 of Migraine and Headache Awareness Month

8:30 PM chronicmigraineellie 1 Comments


#day3
 of #mham17 is about comorbid disorders and migraines! Migraines often come with other health problems, including mental health issues as well. Feelings of guilt and shame about having migraines and headache disorders often compound the hardships of chronic illness, and may people feel scared to reach out for help when they need it. If you know someone with a chronic and/or invisible illness, take a second and think about how you react when they tell you about their pain/medical problems/doctor's appointments. Try to put yourself in their shoes, and remember that it's often hard and difficult for many sufferers to talk about their experiences with other people. Even asking a simple question, like "what can I do to help you during a migraine?" will go a long way and I know it makes me feel much more supported. So take a minute today and just think about how you can be an ally and be supportive of your loved one or friend.
#day4 of #mham2017 is about support systems. I would not be where I am without my friends and family. They are there for me during both good and bad times. Having amazing people beside you makes chronic illness a bit easier to deal with, and makes to good times even better. So much love for my Wes family ❤️

#day6 of #mham2017 is about chronic fatigue and energy problems! I'm going to be doing a post on spoon theory later this month, but I thought that this was too funny to not post! Just a bit of insight into the difficulties of having energy problems with a chronic illness.


Did you know that migraines can cause central sensitivity? I do, because this has happened to me. The best way to describe it is when the central nervous system becomes unnaturally sensitized due to ongoing stimulation. Basically, the neurons develop a "memory" of the pain signals that are present during migraines and changes to make pain signals travel more easily. This can be related to neurotransmitters, like glutamate and GABA. For me, I needed to go onto a medication that upped my glutamate levels, as well as stopping all abortive triptans to break my central sensitization. Thanks migraine.com for the definition! I posted this last year, but it's an important topic so I wanted to repost it! #mham #day7

#day8 of #mham2017 is a #tbt to Headache on the Hill 2017! It was an amazing experience to be a patient advocate for migraines and chronic pain. Read more about my experience lobbying in DC on my blog! http://chronicmigraineellie.blogspot.com/2017/02/headache-on-hill-2017.html?m=1

1 comment:

  1. Chronic pain management

    Suboxone combines a synthetic opioid-like substance called buprenorphine with a drug called naloxone. Buprenorphine has two benefits. It activates the same receptor as opioids for analgesia, called the µ-receptor. Buprenorphine also blocks the receptor which causes dysphoria/euphoria, called the ĸ-receptor. In other words, it provides pain relief similar to opioids but without giving the patient the feeling of being “high”. Naloxone, on the other hand, helps deter abuse of the medication. If Suboxone is taken in a way it isn’t suppose to be taken (e.g. injected or insufflated), the naloxone with immediately inactivate the buprenorphine effectively “defeating the purpose” of abusing the drug.

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